Brexit news: Merkel admits Macron ‘confrontations’ over Britain | World | News

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But the German Chancellor insisted the pair are ”on a very similar wavelength” as she dismissed claims of a dispute between the recently rekindled relationship. Mrs Merkel said: “Of course, we wrestle with each other. There are differences in mentality between us as well as differences in how we understand our respective roles. It was always like this. President Macron isn’t the first French president I have worked with, after all.” Her rebuttal comes after it emerged cracks had begun to appear between France and Germany when Prime Minister Theresa May requested a delay to Article 50 in a bid to break the Brexit deadlock earlier this year. 

While German Chancellor Angela Merkel was keen to give Britain the time it needed to break the impasse, French President Emmanuel Macron was opposed to any further delays on Britain’s departure.

But Mrs Merkel denied tension, telling German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung: “In core questions – where is Europe heading, the economy, what’s our responsibility for the climate and Africa – we are on a very similar wavelength.

“That includes the question of where we, if necessary, must act independently from the United States, even though I do not wish for such situations.”

And Mr Macron was quick to deny claims of a rift as he spoke at a press conference in Paris where he described their relationship as “productive confrontation”

He said: “She said we work together all the time, we find compromises and we try to build them, but there is discussion.

“In a relationship in particular between France and Germany, what are the options? The scenario of sterile confrontation – we have disagreements and we cannot go beyond them.

“We’ve been through that in the past. It can lead to the worst situations, either powerlessness or war.”

France and Germany have remained divided on the way forward for Britain. 

While Mrs Merkel hopes Britain will remain in the Brussels bloc, Emmanuel Macron wants the UK to leave quickly.

The EU heavyweights renewed their vows of postwar friendship in a desperate bid to seek strength at the top of the bloc.

In an attempt to take full control of the European Union and create a bloc-wide army, the German Chancellor and French President signed off the Aachen treaty.

The extension to the Elysee Treaty, which affirmed the two nations’ post-war reconciliation in 1963, was signed at a ceremony in the German border city of Aachen.

 



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